The Military Army Blog

Former British army sergeant who lost both his legs in a bomb blast in Afghanistan is refused NHS treatment because he had a new surgical procedure in…

A British army double amputee was told that he wouldn’t be able to receive anymore NHS treatment because he had travelled to Australia for a new surgical procedure. Jay Baldwin lost both of his legs in a bomb blast whilst fighting for his country in Afghanistan. The former sergeant was informed by staff at the Sussex rehabilitation centre that his treatment would be stopped because he had osseointegration surgery, not available on the NHS.

Jay Baldwin lost both of his legs in a bomb blast whilst fighting for his country in Afghanistan

Jay tries out his mobility after undergoing osseointegration, an experimental new operation not available on the NHS. Recalling the day he was informed the shocking news, Jay said: ‘They said to me, ‘Look, under the NHS we can’t deal with you, we can’t touch you at all,’

The 30-year-old insisted: ‘I don’t ever like to pull this card, but I have fought for the country, I have got these injuries through Afghanistan.

‘For the NHS to turn around and tell me that I can’t be treated I think is quite disgusting,’ he said. Sussex Community NHS Trust have insisted that their decision was based solely on the official rules before confirming that it would be happy to make an exception and continue treating Mr Baldwin.

Jay decided to have the procedure last February after being awarded 87,000 from the Friends of the Princess of Wale’s Royal Regiment

Osseointegration is a relatively new procedure, pioneered by Mr al-Muder, who has carried out the operation around 150 times. Titanium implants are fused with the remaining limb and adapters are added to create a stronger joint for attaching prosthetics

An NHS spokesman confirmed that an independent investigation into the risk of the treatment willl be carried out.

‘This is a new technique with potentially significant life-threatening complications which have to be fully understood to avoid risking patient safety’, the spokesman said. Osseointegration is a relatively new procedure, pioneered by Munjed al-Muder, an Australian surgeon who has carried out the operation around 150 times. The technique require the fusing of special metal implants into the surviving injured limb. Made out of titanium, the implant are then combined with special adaptors which serve as the new joint.

Jay decided to have the procedure last February after being awarded 87,000 from the Friends of the Princess of Wale’s Royal Regiment. He had been suffering unbearable pain and bad bleeding from his artificial legs prior to the surgery. Munjed al-Muders, who was forced to flee his homeland of Iraq, treated Mr Baldwin and revealed he was ‘shocked’ by the NHS’s initial refusal to continue treatment.

On his trip to Australia, Prince Harry visited Mr al-Muder’s clinic, claiming the procedure was ‘life changing’ and that injured British servicemen should receive the same surgery.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*