The Military Army Blog

Soil bacterium could help combat stress, psychiatric problems

Bacterium naturally found in soil may have healing effects when prepared as an immunization, according to a new study. The study, Immunization with a heat-killed preparation of the environmental bacterium Mycobacterium vaccae promotes stress resilience in mice[1], was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences[2]. It revealed that when mice were injected with Mycobacterium vaccae (M. vaccae NCTC 11659), stress resilience and coping behaviors were improved, and stress-induced colitis was prevented. Mice given a heat-killed preparation of the bacterium were half as likely to display flight or avoidance behaviors when confronted by an aggressor in the short-term period after injection, and showed decreased levels of submissive behaviors for up to two weeks later, according to the study.

Stress-induced colitis, an irritable bowel disease, was also reduced in mice injected with the bacterium. Researchers saw a 50% reduction in the condition in the treated mice, measured by cellular damage to the colon and infiltration of immune cells.

Christopher A. Lowry, PhD[3], an associate professor in the department of Integrative Physiology at the University of Colorado Boulder and the senior author of the new research, says the results of the study point toward common mechanisms underlying vulnerability to stress-related psychiatric disorders, allergies, asthma and autoimmune conditions.

References

  1. ^ Immunization with a heat-killed preparation of the environmental bacterium Mycobacterium vaccae promotes stress resilience in mice (www.pnas.org)
  2. ^ Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (www.pnas.org)
  3. ^ Christopher A. Lowry, PhD (www.colorado.edu)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*