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The Histories: No. 2 (Loeb Classical Library)

The Histories: No. 2 (Loeb Classical Library)

The Histories: No. 2 (Loeb Classical Library)


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The historian Polybius (ca 200-118 BCE) was born into a leading family of Megalopolis in the Peloponnese (Morea) and served the Achaean League in arms and diplomacy for many years, favoring alliance with Rome. This title offers a translation of Polybius’ work.

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Reprobates: The Cavaliers of the English Civil War

Reprobates: The Cavaliers of the English Civil War

Reprobates: The Cavaliers of the English Civil War


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From disastrous foreign forays to syphilitic poets, from political intriguing to ambitious young playwrights keen to curry favour with the king, this title brings alive the vibrant cast of characters that were at the centre of the English Civil War.

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In Search of Shakespeare

In Search of Shakespeare

In Search of Shakespeare


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Almost 400 years after his death, William Shakespeare is still acclaimed as the world’s greatest writer.There can be few more appropriate writers and TV presenters to go In Search of Shakespeare than Michael Wood. Having already gone In Search of England and pursued the history of the Conquistadors in his recent acclaimed series, Wood has now taken on The Bard in the book to accompany his latest TV series. This is well-trodden ground, but Wood tells the story with relish and an historian’s eye for detail, dismissing Bardolatry in favour of a “tale of one man’s life, lived through a time of revolution–a time when not only England, but the larger world beyond, would go through momentous changes.”

From Shakespeare’s early days in Warwickshire to the sophisticated world of theatrical life and political skulduggery in London, Wood makes few claims to new discoveries, but offers a refreshingly global understanding of what drove Shakespeare and his creativity, from his Catholic origins to the Black Londoners that he met every day. Wood too often has to “enter the realm of diverting speculation rather than that of verifiable historical fact”. Did Shakespeare have an affair with Emilia Lanier? Did he die an alcoholic? Wood colourfully poses such questions, though too many remain unanswered; he cheerfully admits that he’s no Shakespeare scholar, but a popular historian who has enthusiastically placed Shakespeare back into the extraordinarily fertile world that produced him. —Jerry Brotton

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