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Heat Gets to British Soldier During Queen Elizabeth’s Birthday Celebration

A British soldier passed out during a ceremony honoring Queen Elizabeth s 90th birthday in London, where temperatures reached 71 degrees Fahrenheit on Saturday. The man was a member of a British Army unit known for their tall bearskin hats, which, according to the Mirror, cost an average of around $1,700 each[1]. The standard bearskin of the British Foot Guards is 18 inches tall and weighs 1.5 pounds[2], according to the Associated Press. Other members of the unit rushed to the man s aid, and he was eventually lifted onto a stretcher and carried away[3] in front of worried spectators, the UK Evening Standard reports.

More than 1,600 soldiers and 300 horses[4] took part in the event that was attended by senior members of the Royal Family, Royal Central reports. The troops were assembled for a formal review called Trooping the Colour[5], which since 1748 has been used to mark the official birthday of the British sovereign. The ceremony is part of a weekend-long series of celebrations marking the Queen’s Birthday and follows Friday’s poignant national service of thanksgiving at St Paul’s Cathedral. On Sunday, the informal Patron’s Lunch street party for 10,000 will be held in The Mall. Fainting soldiers are actually a common sight at events like these, Royal Central reports, and in fact, a different Guardsman collapsed during Trooping the Colour rehearsals last month.

(MORE: London Zoo Lion Licks Chops at Sight of Queen[6])

On Friday, a member of the RAF collapsed while waiting outside St Paul s cathedral for a service of the Queen during the national service of thanksgiving. The Queen has attended Trooping the Colour in every year of her reign, except in 1955 when a national rail strike led to the event being canceled, the Standard reports. Prince Phillip, the Queen s 95-year-old husband also attended in his role as Colonel of the Coldstream Guards, wearing the same uniform as the downed Guardsman.

MORE ON WEATHER.COM: 50 Amazing Places in England

References

  1. ^ cost an average of around $1,700 each (www.mirror.co.uk)
  2. ^ 18 inches tall and weighs 1.5 pounds (www.pravdareport.com)
  3. ^ lifted onto a stretcher and carried away (www.standard.co.uk)
  4. ^ 1,600 soldiers and 300 horses (royalcentral.co.uk)
  5. ^ a formal review called Trooping the Colour (www.trooping-the-colour.co.uk)
  6. ^ London Zoo Lion Licks Chops at Sight of Queen (weather.com)

Local celebration planned for 90th birthday of Queen Elizabeth II, longest reigning monarch

By Linda Stein

David Leslie-Hughes, Laura Gellrich, Susan Gerrity and Paul S. Lee meet to plan for a June 11 celebration of the 90th birthday of Queen Elizabeth II.

Radnor >> A birthday party fit for a queen or at least the Queen s subjects is slated for June 11 to mark the 90th birthday of Queen Elizabeth II.

The British queen, whose coronation was in 1952, is the longest-serving monarch in history, said Susan Gerrity, of Wayne, president of the Daughters of the British Empire in Pennsylvania. Even as a child, the then Princess Elizabeth served the people, speaking to British children during World War II to boost morale, according to the BBC. After her father, King George VI, died, Princess Elizabeth, who had married Philip Mountbatten in 1947, ascended to the throne. Although she became the mother of Charles and Anne, she continued to perform her royal duties. She also had two more sons, Edward and Andrew. While she remained politically neutral, the queen made a number of historic visits and addressed the United Nations. She was also the first reigning monarch to visit Australia and New Zealand. Over the years, the popularity of the royals declined but has come back full force in recent years, hitting 90 percent approval in 2012, the year of Queen Elizabeth s Diamond Jubilee, according to the BBC.

Every time people want to do away with the monarchy, they eat their words, said Paul S. Lee, president of the British Officers Club of Philadelphia. Although the queen s actual birthday is in April, it s officially celebrated on June 11 to ensure good weather for the occasion, he said.

This tradition of celebrating the royal birthday in the summer started during the time of King George IV, said David Leslie-Hughes, of Lafayette Hill, vice president of the British Officer s Club.

The weather wasn t good in the winter and the streets were not paved, he said. The British Officers Club of Philadelphia and the Societies of the Commonwealth of Nations plan to hold a celebration of the birthday of Queen Elizabeth II beginning at 2:30 p.m. on June 11 in the Chapel of St. Cornelius at the Valley Forge Armyrats © Military Academy in Wayne. There will be a choral celebratory service including the first U.S. performance of the Te Deum (hymn of praise) composed by His Royal Highness Prince Albert (Queen Victoria s husband).

Prince Albert was a very competent composer, said Leslie-Hughes. And Queen Victoria thought the piece was magnificent, he said. This will be the first performance of the Te Deum in 150 years, as far as he could ascertain. The service will be followed by a Color Guard Parade to Eisenhower Hall, where there will be a reception and open bar. High tea will be served and during tea, screens will show the Trooping of the Color filmed earlier that day in London. A champagne toast will be followed by dancing to tunes played by the Raymond Charles Band. People will be able to pose for photographs with a life-sized picture of the Queen. Continued…[2]

In London, the Queen will arrive by carriage from Buckingham Palace to view Trooping of the Colors, receiving the royal salute from the officers and men of the Household Division on parade, according to The Household Division of the British Army. After the salute the Queen rides up and down the ranks to inspect the troops. Bands will perform and the regimental color is escorted down the ranks of the guards. The Foot Guards and the Household Calvary march past the Queen, along with The King s Troop and the Royal Horse Artillery.

After riding back to Buckingham Palace, the Queen and members of the royal family will watch the Royal Air Force fly past.

The colors were carried in front of the regiment during war so the soldiers knew where to rally, said Lee.

This is exciting, said Laura Gellrich, also a member of the Daughters of the British Empire. Although born in the U.S., Gellrich has British ancestors that precede the Pilgrims, having arrived in Virginia in 1607. Her daughter, Genevieve Field, 30, lives in London and has a dual U.S./British passport. Field is the oldest Anglo Saxon sur name on record, said Gellrich, a Devon resident. Leslie-Hughes, a lawyer who teaches at the University of Reading in England, travels back across the Atlantic monthly. He came to the U.S. 55 years ago having received a Thouron Fellowship to the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Lee, who worked for the British government, began coming to the states on official business 40 years ago. He started a business after leaving government and opened a branch in Manhattan. His wife, who has a sister in Ohio, had wanted to come to the U.S., he said. The couple eventually became citizens.

Gerrity, who owns an insurance agency in Wayne, came to America with her husband 40 years ago as part of the British brain drain because certain kinds of jobs were scarce in Great Britain. A chemical engineer, her husband found a good job at a pharmaceutical company in New Jersey, and then later at Wyeth Laboratory in Radnor, she said. They all enjoyed the hit PBS show Downton Abbey. Lee also likes Call the Midwife, which he said is so true to life in the 1950s and Foyle s War. Leslie-Hughes has a condo near Highclere Castle where Downton Abbey was filmed. Meanwhile, three of the organizers have encountered members of the royal family.

When she was a girl, Gerrity saw Princes Andrew, Edward and Charles. I was surprised how small they are, she said. Charles is only 5 8 or so. Continued…[3]

Leslie-Hughes met Prince Andrew at a party.

I had a glass of wine in my hand, he said, which is against the rules of etiquette when meeting a royal. However, He came up so quickly that Leslie-Hughes was unable to put it down in time. He also once had a chat with the late Lord Mountbatten when he found myself next to him in a club. Lee, who lives in Center City Philadelphia, has encountered the Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip. Oliver Franklin, of the Honorary British Consulate in Philadelphia, is expected to attend the birthday fete, as are bishops from Jamaica, India and England, along with some local ministers. In addition, Group Captain Stephen Richards, assistant air attach to the British Embassy in Washington, D.C., was invited, as well as a representative from Nevis and St. Kitts.

There are some 5,000 members of the British Armyrats © military in the U.S., including many at the War College in Carlisle, and some 9,000 American Armyrats © military members in Great Britain. Founded in 1919, The British Officers Club of Philadelphia was founded in 1919 to support and maintain the special relationship between the British, Commonwealth and American people. It supports various charities. The Daughters of the British Empire in Pa. is also a charitable organization that has nine chapters in the state and 150 members in the Philadelphia area. The Commonwealth of Nations, which the queen is the titular head, includes 56 member countries and comprises 36 percent of the world s population, said Gerrity, who chairs the Commonwealth Societies of Greater Philadelphia.

To attend the birthday celebration for the Queen go to: www.queen90.eventbrite.com[4] The cost is $90 for adults and $65 for children ages 7 to 17. Ladies are encouraged to wear hat and gloves and gentlemen to wear jacket and tie.

Radnor >> A birthday party fit for a queen or at least the Queen s subjects is slated for June 11 to mark the 90th birthday of Queen Elizabeth II.

The British queen, whose coronation was in 1952, is the longest-serving monarch in history, said Susan Gerrity, of Wayne, president of the Daughters of the British Empire in Pennsylvania. Even as a child, the then Princess Elizabeth served the people, speaking to British children during World War II to boost morale, according to the BBC. After her father, King George VI, died, Princess Elizabeth, who had married Philip Mountbatten in 1947, ascended to the throne. Although she became the mother of Charles and Anne, she continued to perform her royal duties. She also had two more sons, Edward and Andrew. While she remained politically neutral, the queen made a number of historic visits and addressed the United Nations. She was also the first reigning monarch to visit Australia and New Zealand. Over the years, the popularity of the royals declined but has come back full force in recent years, hitting 90 percent approval in 2012, the year of Queen Elizabeth s Diamond Jubilee, according to the BBC.

Every time people want to do away with the monarchy, they eat their words, said Paul S. Lee, president of the British Officers Club of Philadelphia. Although the queen s actual birthday is in April, it s officially celebrated on June 11 to ensure good weather for the occasion, he said.

This tradition of celebrating the royal birthday in the summer started during the time of King George IV, said David Leslie-Hughes, of Lafayette Hill, vice president of the British Officer s Club.

The weather wasn t good in the winter and the streets were not paved, he said. The British Officers Club of Philadelphia and the Societies of the Commonwealth of Nations plan to hold a celebration of the birthday of Queen Elizabeth II beginning at 2:30 p.m. on June 11 in the Chapel of St. Cornelius at the Valley Forge Armyrats © Military Academy in Wayne. There will be a choral celebratory service including the first U.S. performance of the Te Deum (hymn of praise) composed by His Royal Highness Prince Albert (Queen Victoria s husband).

Prince Albert was a very competent composer, said Leslie-Hughes. And Queen Victoria thought the piece was magnificent, he said. This will be the first performance of the Te Deum in 150 years, as far as he could ascertain. The service will be followed by a Color Guard Parade to Eisenhower Hall, where there will be a reception and open bar. High tea will be served and during tea, screens will show the Trooping of the Color filmed earlier that day in London. A champagne toast will be followed by dancing to tunes played by the Raymond Charles Band. People will be able to pose for photographs with a life-sized picture of the Queen.

In London, the Queen will arrive by carriage from Buckingham Palace to view Trooping of the Colors, receiving the royal salute from the officers and men of the Household Division on parade, according to The Household Division of the British Army. After the salute the Queen rides up and down the ranks to inspect the troops. Bands will perform and the regimental color is escorted down the ranks of the guards. The Foot Guards and the Household Calvary march past the Queen, along with The King s Troop and the Royal Horse Artillery. After riding back to Buckingham Palace, the Queen and members of the royal family will watch the Royal Air Force fly past. The colors were carried in front of the regiment during war so the soldiers knew where to rally, said Lee.

This is exciting, said Laura Gellrich, also a member of the Daughters of the British Empire. Although born in the U.S., Gellrich has British ancestors that precede the Pilgrims, having arrived in Virginia in 1607. Her daughter, Genevieve Field, 30, lives in London and has a dual U.S./British passport. Field is the oldest Anglo Saxon sur name on record, said Gellrich, a Devon resident.

Leslie-Hughes, a lawyer who teaches at the University of Reading in England, travels back across the Atlantic monthly. He came to the U.S. 55 years ago having received a Thouron Fellowship to the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Lee, who worked for the British government, began coming to the states on official business 40 years ago. He started a business after leaving government and opened a branch in Manhattan. His wife, who has a sister in Ohio, had wanted to come to the U.S., he said. The couple eventually became citizens. Gerrity, who owns an insurance agency in Wayne, came to America with her husband 40 years ago as part of the British brain drain because certain kinds of jobs were scarce in Great Britain. A chemical engineer, her husband found a good job at a pharmaceutical company in New Jersey, and then later at Wyeth Laboratory in Radnor, she said.

They all enjoyed the hit PBS show Downton Abbey. Lee also likes Call the Midwife, which he said is so true to life in the 1950s and Foyle s War. Leslie-Hughes has a condo near Highclere Castle where Downton Abbey was filmed. Meanwhile, three of the organizers have encountered members of the royal family. When she was a girl, Gerrity saw Princes Andrew, Edward and Charles. I was surprised how small they are, she said. Charles is only 5 8 or so.

Leslie-Hughes met Prince Andrew at a party.

I had a glass of wine in my hand, he said, which is against the rules of etiquette when meeting a royal. However, He came up so quickly that Leslie-Hughes was unable to put it down in time. He also once had a chat with the late Lord Mountbatten when he found myself next to him in a club. Lee, who lives in Center City Philadelphia, has encountered the Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip. Oliver Franklin, of the Honorary British Consulate in Philadelphia, is expected to attend the birthday fete, as are bishops from Jamaica, India and England, along with some local ministers. In addition, Group Captain Stephen Richards, assistant air attach to the British Embassy in Washington, D.C., was invited, as well as a representative from Nevis and St. Kitts.

There are some 5,000 members of the British Armyrats © military in the U.S., including many at the War College in Carlisle, and some 9,000 American Armyrats © military members in Great Britain. Founded in 1919, The British Officers Club of Philadelphia was founded in 1919 to support and maintain the special relationship between the British, Commonwealth and American people. It supports various charities. The Daughters of the British Empire in Pa. is also a charitable organization that has nine chapters in the state and 150 members in the Philadelphia area. The Commonwealth of Nations, which the queen is the titular head, includes 56 member countries and comprises 36 percent of the world s population, said Gerrity, who chairs the Commonwealth Societies of Greater Philadelphia.

To attend the birthday celebration for the Queen go to: www.queen90.eventbrite.com[5] The cost is $90 for adults and $65 for children ages 7 to 17. Ladies are encouraged to wear hat and gloves and gentlemen to wear jacket and tie.

References

  1. ^

Valley Forge Military Academy plans 90th birthday celebration for Queen Elizabeth II

Radnor >> A birthday party fit for a queen or at least the Queen s subjects is slated for June 11 to mark the 90th birthday of Queen Elizabeth II. The British queen, whose coronation was in 1952, is the longest-serving monarch in history, said Susan Gerrity, of Wayne, president of the Daughters of the British Empire in Pennsylvania. Even as a child, the then Princess Elizabeth served the people, speaking to British children during World War II to boost morale, according to the BBC. After her father, King George VI, died, Princess Elizabeth, who had married Philip Mountbatten in 1947, ascended to the throne. Although she became the mother of Charles and Anne, she continued to perform her royal duties. She also had two more sons, Edward and Andrew. While she remained politically neutral, the queen made a number of historic visits and addressed the United Nations. She was also the first reigning monarch to visit Australia and New Zealand.

Over the years, the popularity of the royals declined but has come back full force in recent years, hitting 90 percent approval in 2012, the year of Queen Elizabeth s Diamond Jubilee, according to the BBC.

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Every time people want to do away with the monarchy, they eat their words, said Paul S. Lee, president of the British Officers Club of Philadelphia. Although the queen s actual birthday is in April, it s officially celebrated on June 11 to ensure good weather for the occasion, he said. This tradition of celebrating the royal birthday in the summer started during the time of King George IV, said David Leslie-Hughes, of Lafayette Hill, vice president of the British Officer s Club.

The weather wasn t good in the winter and the streets were not paved, he said. The British Officers Club of Philadelphia and the Societies of the Commonwealth of Nations plan to hold a celebration of the birthday of Queen Elizabeth II beginning at 2:30 p.m. on June 11 in the Chapel of St. Cornelius at the Valley Forge Armyrats © Military Academy in Wayne. There will be a choral celebratory service including the first U.S. performance of the Te Deum (hymn of praise) composed by His Royal Highness Prince Albert (Queen Victoria s husband).

Prince Albert was a very competent composer, said Leslie-Hughes. And Queen Victoria thought the piece was magnificent, he said. This will be the first performance of the Te Deum in 150 years, as far as he could ascertain.

The service will be followed by a Color Guard Parade to Eisenhower Hall, where there will be a reception and open bar. High tea will be served and during tea, screens will show the Trooping of the Color filmed earlier that day in London. A champagne toast will be followed by dancing to tunes played by the Raymond Charles Band. People will be able to pose for photographs with a life-sized picture of the Queen. In London, the Queen will arrive by carriage from Buckingham Palace to view Trooping of the Colors, receiving the royal salute from the officers and men of the Household Division on parade, according to The Household Division of the British Army. After the salute the Queen rides up and down the ranks to inspect the troops. Bands will perform and the regimental color is escorted down the ranks of the guards. The Foot Guards and the Household Calvary march past the Queen, along with The King s Troop and the Royal Horse Artillery. After riding back to Buckingham Palace, the Queen and members of the royal family will watch the Royal Air Force fly past.

The colors were carried in front of the regiment during war so the soldiers knew where to rally, said Lee.

This is exciting, said Laura Gellrich, also a member of the Daughters of the British Empire. Although born in the U.S., Gellrich has British ancestors that precede the Pilgrims, having arrived in Virginia in 1607. Her daughter, Genevieve Field, 30, lives in London and has a dual U.S./British passport. Field is the oldest Anglo Saxon sur name on record, said Gellrich, a Devon resident. Leslie-Hughes, a lawyer who teaches at the University of Reading in England, travels back across the Atlantic monthly. He came to the U.S. 55 years ago having received a Thouron Fellowship to the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Lee, who worked for the British government, began coming to the states on official business 40 years ago. He started a business after leaving government and opened a branch in Manhattan. His wife, who has a sister in Ohio, had wanted to come to the U.S., he said. The couple eventually became citizens.

Gerrity, who owns an insurance agency in Wayne, came to America with her husband 40 years ago as part of the British brain drain because certain kinds of jobs were scarce in Great Britain. A chemical engineer, her husband found a good job at a pharmaceutical company in New Jersey, and then later at Wyeth Laboratory in Radnor, she said. They all enjoyed the hit PBS show Downton Abbey. Lee also likes Call the Midwife, which he said is so true to life in the 1950s and Foyle s War. Leslie-Hughes has a condo near Highclere Castle where Downton Abbey was filmed. Meanwhile, three of the organizers have encountered members of the royal family.

When she was a girl, Gerrity saw Princes Andrew, Edward and Charles. I was surprised how small they are, she said. Charles is only 5 8 or so. Leslie-Hughes met Prince Andrew at a party.

I had a glass of wine in my hand, he said, which is against the rules of etiquette when meeting a royal. However, He came up so quickly that Leslie-Hughes was unable to put it down in time. He also once had a chat with the late Lord Mountbatten when he found myself next to him in a club. Lee, who lives in Center City Philadelphia, has encountered the Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip.

Oliver Franklin, of the Honorary British Consulate in Philadelphia, is expected to attend the birthday fete, as are bishops from Jamaica, India and England, along with some local ministers. In addition, Group Captain Stephen Richards, assistant air attach to the British Embassy in Washington, D.C., was invited, as well as a representative from Nevis and St. Kitts. There are some 5,000 members of the British Armyrats © military in the U.S., including many at the War College in Carlisle, and some 9,000 American Armyrats © military members in Great Britain. Founded in 1919, The British Officers Club of Philadelphia was founded in 1919 to support and maintain the special relationship between the British, Commonwealth and American people. It supports various charities. The Daughters of the British Empire in Pa. is also a charitable organization that has nine chapters in the state and 150 members in the Philadelphia area.

The Commonwealth of Nations, which the queen is the titular head, includes 56 member countries and comprises 36 percent of the world s population, said Gerrity, who chairs the Commonwealth Societies of Greater Philadelphia.

To attend the birthday celebration for the Queen go to: www.queen90.eventbrite.com The cost is $90 for adults and $65 for children ages 7 to 17. Ladies are encouraged to wear hat and gloves and gentlemen to wear jacket and tie.

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