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British soldier fighting ISIS vows to ‘finish’ the terror group and says he and his Iraqi kurd ‘brothers’ are reclaiming territory despite having WWII…

  • Former soldier Alan Duncan, 48, left Scotland last year to fight ISIS in Iraq
  • He has vowed to continue battling the terror group until they are ‘finished’
  • Mr Duncan fights alongside the Peshmerga, the people’s army of Kurdistan
  • He claims Syrian and Iraqi refugees openly welcome airstrikes over IS rule

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A former soldier who left Scotland to fight ISIS[1] in Iraq has told how the ‘people’s army’ he serves with are forced to use Second World War weapons and some of his ‘brothers’ are missing limbs. Despite the challenging circumstances, 48-year-old Alan Duncan has vowed to continue battling the terror group until they are ‘finished’. The Gulf War veteran has spoken of fighting alongside ‘top generals’ on the frontline as he and members of the Peshmerga, the Iraqi Kurdistan forces, seek to reclaim ISIS-held territory.

Vow: Gulf War veteran Alan Duncan (left) says he will continue fighting ISIS until the terror group are ‘finished’. He left his home in Scotland last year to battle ISIS in Iraq and fights alongside Iraqi Kurdistan forces

Mr Duncan, who left his home country last year, also claimed refugees in Syria and Iraq openly welcome western airstrikes as a way to escape the brutality of living under ISIS rule. The Peshmerga has been battling ISIS for several years. When the Iraqi army retreated, the Peshmerga were left to continue the fight, and while ISIS went on to gain ground in the Kurdish region, most of it has been recovered by Iraqi Kurdistan forces.

Mr Duncan, who has partially self-funded his trip to fight ISIS but has also raised extra money through an online campaign which he promotes on Facebook, has previously told how he was motivated to leave behind the tiny Scots village where he lives ‘to do the right thing’. He now fights alongside the Kurds, who he said treat him ‘like a brother’. The former soldier also said it was not unusual to be on the frontline alongside a 60-year-old man and fighters who have lost limbs.

He said: ‘They are fighting for people of all faiths. They are very secular and very democratic. They are Muslims but faith is a non issue. It’s very much about humanity for them. Sharing his experience: The 48-year-old (pictured) has spoken of fighting alongside ‘top generals’ on the frontline as he and members of the Peshmerga, the Iraqi Kurdistan forces, seek to reclaim ISIS-held territory

‘They see Daesh very much like the rest of us. They don’t represent as far as they are concerned Muslims or the Muslim faith, they have hijacked it.’

Mr Duncan, who previously served with the Royal Irish and Queen’s Own Highlanders regiments, said that while ISIS fights with modern weapons, the Peshmerga are using old Russian guns from the Sixties and Seventies. He has even seen some fighters using weapons dating as far back as the Second World War, although such low-grade equipment doesn’t appear to have held them back.

Mr Duncan said: ‘In my unit there are two men with missing legs through war.

‘However that kind of sums up the Peshmerga spirit. They are saying “I can still fight, I’m fighting for my country, for my people, for humanity”.

‘You’ve got guys with missing legs and arms yet they’ll be on the frontline fighting. Support: Mr Duncan, who left his home country last year, also claimed refugees in Syria and Iraq openly welcome western airstrikes as a way to escape the brutality of living under ISIS rule

The former soldier, who served with the Royal Irish and Queen’s Own Highlanders regiments, said that while ISIS fights with modern weapons, the Peshmerga are using old Russian guns from the Sixties and Seventies

‘You’ve got top generals on the frontline, how many armies can say that? I’m ex-British Army, it’s unheard of.’

The 48-year-old also claimed that despite civilian casualties at the hands of airstrikes, the Peshmerga appreciate the support from foreign governments. He said: ‘The airstrikes are very much appreciated. The airstrikes are working, Daesh are surrendering because of airstrikes.

‘What you have to remember is Daesh took a lot of Arab towns and villages and a lot of Arabs jumped onto Daesh because they thought that was the winning side.

‘But now they see the writing on the wall. A lot of them are surrendering. I actually look after a lot of Daesh prisoners.

‘They see me and you can see the hate in some of their eyes.

‘But the main thing that you see is that they are tired, they are scared but then they realise that we are treating them well, we’re feeding them, they are sleeping with blankets, we treat them under the Geneva Convention.’

References

  1. ^ ISIS (www.dailymail.co.uk)

British soldier fighting ISIS vows to ‘finish’ the terror group and says he and his Iraqi ‘brothers’ are reclaiming territory despite having WWII…

  • Former soldier Alan Duncan, 48, left Scotland last year to fight ISIS in Iraq
  • He has vowed to continue battling the terror group until they are ‘finished’
  • Mr Duncan fights alongside the Peshmerga, the people’s army of Kurdistan
  • He claims Syrian and Iraqi refugees openly welcome airstrikes over IS rule

|

4

View
comments

A former soldier who left Scotland to fight ISIS[1] in Iraq has told how the ‘people’s army’ he serves with are forced to use Second World War weapons and some of his ‘brothers’ are missing limbs. Despite the challenging circumstances, 48-year-old Alan Duncan has vowed to continue battling the terror group until they are ‘finished’. The Gulf War veteran has spoken of fighting alongside ‘top generals’ on the frontline as he and members of the Peshmerga, the Iraqi Kurdistan forces, seek to reclaim ISIS-held territory.

Vow: Gulf War veteran Alan Duncan (left) says he will continue fighting ISIS until the terror group are ‘finished’. He left his home in Scotland last year to battle ISIS in Iraq and fights alongside Iraqi Kurdistan forces

Mr Duncan, who left his home country last year, also claimed refugees in Syria and Iraq openly welcome western airstrikes as a way to escape the brutality of living under ISIS rule. The Peshmerga has been battling ISIS for several years. When the Iraqi army retreated, the Peshmerga were left to continue the fight, and while ISIS went on to gain ground in the Kurdish region, most of it has been recovered by Iraqi Kurdistan forces.

Mr Duncan, who has partially self-funded his trip to fight ISIS but has also raised extra money through an online campaign which he promotes on Facebook, has previously told how he was motivated to leave behind the tiny Scots village where he lives ‘to do the right thing’. He now fights alongside the Kurds, who he said treat him ‘like a brother’. The former soldier also said it was not unusual to be on the frontline alongside a 60-year-old man and fighters who have lost limbs.

He said: ‘They are fighting for people of all faiths. They are very secular and very democratic. They are Muslims but faith is a non issue. It’s very much about humanity for them. Sharing his experience: The 48-year-old (pictured) has spoken of fighting alongside ‘top generals’ on the frontline as he and members of the Peshmerga, the Iraqi Kurdistan forces, seek to reclaim ISIS-held territory

‘They see Daesh very much like the rest of us. They don’t represent as far as they are concerned Muslims or the Muslim faith, they have hijacked it.’

Mr Duncan, who previously served with the Royal Irish and Queen’s Own Highlanders regiments, said that while ISIS fights with modern weapons, the Peshmerga are using old Russian guns from the Sixties and Seventies. He has even seen some fighters using weapons dating as far back as the Second World War, although such low-grade equipment doesn’t appear to have held them back.

Mr Duncan said: ‘In my unit there are two men with missing legs through war.

‘However that kind of sums up the Peshmerga spirit. They are saying “I can still fight, I’m fighting for my country, for my people, for humanity”.

‘You’ve got guys with missing legs and arms yet they’ll be on the frontline fighting. Support: Mr Duncan, who left his home country last year, also claimed refugees in Syria and Iraq openly welcome western airstrikes as a way to escape the brutality of living under ISIS rule

The former soldier, who served with the Royal Irish and Queen’s Own Highlanders regiments, said that while ISIS fights with modern weapons, the Peshmerga are using old Russian guns from the Sixties and Seventies

‘You’ve got top generals on the frontline, how many armies can say that? I’m ex-British Army, it’s unheard of.’

The 48-year-old also claimed that despite civilian casualties at the hands of airstrikes, the Peshmerga appreciate the support from foreign governments. He said: ‘The airstrikes are very much appreciated. The airstrikes are working, Daesh are surrendering because of airstrikes.

‘What you have to remember is Daesh took a lot of Arab towns and villages and a lot of Arabs jumped onto Daesh because they thought that was the winning side.

‘But now they see the writing on the wall. A lot of them are surrendering. I actually look after a lot of Daesh prisoners.

‘They see me and you can see the hate in some of their eyes.

‘But the main thing that you see is that they are tired, they are scared but then they realise that we are treating them well, we’re feeding them, they are sleeping with blankets, we treat them under the Geneva Convention.’

References

  1. ^ ISIS (www.dailymail.co.uk)

World War I Studio Portraits Recreated with Modern-Day Service …

World War I Studio Portraits Recreated With Modern-Day Service ...

For its 2015 Poppy Appeal campaign to raise support for current and former British Armyrats © military personnel, the The Royal British Legion commissioned a beautiful photo project that recreates studio portraits of World War I Armyrats © military personnel with modern day serving and ex-service men and women.

We wanted to re-establish the connection between the poppy and the work of the Legion to make the public aware of who we help and what the money raised is spent on, the Legion writes[1]. The poppy[2] was adopted as a symbol of hope in 1921 to help raise funds for veterans returning from the First World War.

Before heading off to war, many of the soldiers and sailors stopped at the E. Reeves Studio photo studio in Lewes, which was established back in 1858 and is still in operation today it s one of the oldest studios in the world.

World War I Studio Portraits Recreated With Modern-Day Service ...

The Legion commissioned Tom Reeves, the current owner of the family-run studio, to recreate portraits that were shot by his great grandfather. With 6 modern-day service personnel and veterans as his subjects, Reeves recreated the century-old photos using the same location and even the same large format camera.

World War I Studio Portraits Recreated With Modern-Day Service ...

Photo by Alex Bamford/The Royal British Legion

World War I Studio Portraits Recreated With Modern-Day Service ...

Photo by Alex Bamford/The Royal British Legion

World War I Studio Portraits Recreated With Modern-Day Service ...

Photo by Alex Bamford/The Royal British Legion

World War I Studio Portraits Recreated With Modern-Day Service ...

Photo by Alex Bamford/The Royal British Legion

Here are the old and new photo diptychs that were created for the advertising campaign:

World War I Studio Portraits Recreated With Modern-Day Service ...

(Left) Sergeant Howard, Cavalry. Fought in the First World War. (Right) Gunner Mark Stonelake, 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery. Served until 2011.

World War I Studio Portraits Recreated With Modern-Day Service ...

(Left) Private Pocock, Infantry. Fought in the First World War. (Right) Chief Petty Officer Peter Edge, Weapons Engineer. Currently serving.

World War I Studio Portraits Recreated With Modern-Day Service ...

(Left) Able Seaman Towner, Royal Navy. Fought in the First World War. (Right) Staff Sergeant Alan Hughes, Queen s Own Highlanders. Served until 1986.

World War I Studio Portraits Recreated With Modern-Day Service ...

(Left) Private Matt, Cavalry Riding Instructor. Fought in The First World War. (Right) Lance Corporal Corie Mapp, Household Cavalry Regiment. Served until 2013.

World War I Studio Portraits Recreated With Modern-Day Service ...

(Left) 2nd Lieutenant H. Lee Esquire, Infantry. Fought in the First World War. (Right) Private Harmeet Singh, Queen Alexandra s Royal Army Nursing Corps. Currently serving

World War I Studio Portraits Recreated With Modern-Day Service ...

(Left) Private Nash, Infantry. Fought in the First World War. (Right) Corporal Linda Noble AGC(SPS), 1st Armyrats © Military Intelligence Corps. Currently serving

Here s a 3-minute behind-the-scenes video for the project:

You can find out more about this campaign and donate to the 2015 Poppy Appeal over on the Royal British Legion website[3].


Image credits: Photographs by the Royal British Legion and used with permission

References

  1. ^ writes (www.britishlegion.org.uk)
  2. ^ The poppy (en.wikipedia.org)
  3. ^ over on the Royal British Legion website (www.britishlegion.org.uk)