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British Army Recruitment & Temperamental Unsuitability

Research Paper Title

Issues In Temperamental Unsuitability Re-Examining Concepts And Current Practice In The British Army.

Abstract

Currently, in the UK military, and particularly in the Army, a significant number of personnel are regularly discharged on the grounds of being assessed as Temperamentally Unsuitable (TU) for Armyrats © military duties , under Queen s Regulations (QRs): (Army) 9.414 and 9.434 (1). In the last two years (2001-2003), preliminary figures suggest that approximately 700 serving personnel were recommended for discharge under this category by only four psychiatrists in the south of England. The regulations governing TU have been in existence and essentially unchanged since their development long before the 1960s albeit subject to parliamentary quinquennial review. The Army General and Administrative Instructions (AGAI) (2) standards also remain unchanged over this period. This paper raises questions about the current validity and relevance of existing TU concepts and regulations with suggestions as to what is being proposed in the context of changing roles, technology and advances in the modern armed forces.

Document

Issues in TU Re-examining Concepts & Current Practice in the BA (Deu et al., 2004)[1]

Reference

Deu, N., Srinivasan, M. & Srinivasan, P. (2004) Issues in TU Re-examining Concepts and Current Practice in the British Army. Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps. 150, pp.179-181.

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  1. ^ Issues in TU Re-examining Concepts & Current Practice in the BA (Deu et al., 2004) (bootcampmilitaryfitnessinstitute.files.wordpress.com)

The British Army: The Boer War & Tactical Developments

Research Paper Title

The Influence of the Boer War (1899-1902) on the Tactical Development of the Regular British Army 1902-1914.

Abstract

This thesis examines the influence of the Boer War 1899 1902 upon tactics and training in the regular British Army 1902 1914. The work argues that several key lessons drawn from South Africa became the tactical cornerstones for infantry, artillery and cavalry throughout the pre-First World War period and shaped the performance of the B.E.F. during the early battles of 1914. The experience of combat against well armed opposition in the Boer War prompted the British Army to develop improved tactics in each of the three major service arms. For example, infantry placed new emphasis on dispersion and marksmanship; cavalry improved their dismounted work and reconnaissance skills; and artillery adopted methods of concealment and strove to improve accuracy and co-ordination. Across the army as a whole, the experience of combat lead to an overall downgrading of the importance of drill and obedience, replacing it instead with tactical skill and individual initiative. In addition, the thesis also examines the impact of the Boer War upon overall British Army doctrine and ethos. The process of reform prior to the First World War was marked by wide ranging debates upon the value of the South African experience, and not all lessons drawn from the conflict endured, with tactical restructuring being further complicated by changes of government and financial restrictions. Nevertheless, key lessons such as dispersion, marksmanship, concealment and firepower were ultimately retained and proved to be of great value during initial clashes against the Germans in 1914. Additionally, the Boer War caused the British to place new emphasis upon overall training of the individual, allowing advanced tactical skills to be inculcated more easily than had been possible in
earlier years. However, the short duration of the conventional period of the Boer War meant that there was less opportunity to derive operational lessons for future employment. Furthermore, the colonial policing role of the British Army and the likelihood of small scale deployments meant that developing an operational doctrine was of less immediate value than ensuring flexibility and tactical skill. This meant that the British Army took a somewhat skewed developmental path in the 1902 1914. The process of reform ultimately produced a highly adaptable force that was tactically skilled, but which was ill-prepared for the operational complications posed by large scale deployment.

While the Boer War was the principal factor in driving reform during the 1902 1914 period, there were additional influences at work, including examples from the Russo-Japanese War 1904 1905 and various ideas drawn from the armies of the continent. However, this thesis argues that while these outside influences contributed to ongoing debate, they did not offer any particular fresh ideas and were therefore of less importance than the Boer War in shaping British Army development.

Document

Influence of the Boer War (1899-1902) on the Tactical Development of the Regular British Army 1902-1914 (Jones, 2009)[1]

Reference

Jones, S. (2009) The Influence of the Boer War (1899-1902) on the Tactical Development of the Regular British Army 1902-1914. Doctoral Thesis. Available from World Wide Web: wlv.openrepository.com/wlv/bitstream/2436/ /Jones_PhD%20thesis.pdf. [Accessed: 17 July, 2015].

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  1. ^ Influence of the Boer War (1899-1902) on the Tactical Development of the Regular British Army 1902-1914 (Jones, 2009) (bootcampmilitaryfitnessinstitute.files.wordpress.com)

British Army: Linking Learning Systems to Organisational Learning …

Research Paper Title

Coping with Knowledge: Organizational Learning in the British Army?

Abstract

This article based on data that employs interviews conducted with British Army personnel adopts a social theory of learning in order to examine how both formal and informal learning systems have affected organisational learning within the Army in relation to the counterinsurgency campaign in Afghanistan. It argues that while the Army has adopted new, or reformed existing, formal learning systems, these have not generated a re-conceptualisation of how to conduct counterinsurgency warfare. It, furthermore, argues that while informal learning systems have enabled units to improve their pre-deployment preparations, these have created adaptation traps that have acted as barriers to higher-level learning.

Document

Coping with Knowledge, Organizational Learning in the British Army (Catignani, 2014)[1]

Reference

Catignani, S. (2014) Coping with Knowledge: Organizational Learning in the British Army? Journal of Strategic Studies. 37(1), pp.30-64.

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  1. ^ Coping with Knowledge, Organizational Learning in the British Army (Catignani, 2014) (bootcampmilitaryfitnessinstitute.files.wordpress.com)